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Ask Phil: What happens to my spouse's coverage on my employer plan?

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ON SCREEN TEXT:             UnitedHealthcare®

PHIL: Hi, I'm Phil Moeller.

A man in a dark suit sits and speaks.

ON SCREEN TEXT: Phil Moeller
                                 "Ask Phil, by UnitedHealthcare"

PHIL: Hi, I’m Phil Moeller. I spend a lot of time writing articles and books, helping people understand Medicare, retirement, and aging. Digging into these subjects gives us a better chance to make more informed health care decisions, and with that in mind, let's explore a question I get asked a lot.

Blue text on a white background replaces Phil.

ON SCREEN TEXT: "My spouse is younger than I am and my
                                 spouse doesn't work. I'm about ready to get
                                 Medicare because I've turned 65.
                                 What happens to my spouse's
                                 coverage on my employer plan?"

PHIL: "My spouse is younger than I am, and my spouse doesn't work. I'm about ready to get Medicare because I've turned 65. What happens to my spouse's coverage on my employer plan?"

Phil comes back into view.

PHIL: The answer is, it depends. If your spouse is covered on your plan and the plan will continue to provide coverage to your spouse or your children when you go on Medicare, then you're fine, but in many cases, the plan may not cover them, and they will need to find coverage in the other private insurance markets, usually on an Affordable Care Act exchange. So this is something you need to talk to your plan about and make sure you understand the impact of you getting Medicare on your family. One thing to keep in mind is that Medicare does not have family coverage. Medicare only covers individuals, so you need to get your own Medicare coverage, and so does anybody else who turns 65 and becomes eligible for Medicare.

ON SCREEN TEXT: For more guidance from Phil, visit
                                 newsroom.uhc.com/askphil.html

ON SCREEN TEXT: UnitedHealthcare