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New Medicare Cards Protect Your Personal Information

Contributed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Starting in April 2018, Medicare will mail new Medicare cards with new Medicare numbers to everyone with Medicare. Your new Medicare number will replace your Social Security Number on your ID card and will be unique to you to help protect you against fraud and keep your personal information more secure.

 

And there’s more good news—Medicare will mail your new card to the address you have on file with Social Security. There’s nothing you need to do! To update your official mailing address, visit your my Social Security account.

If you want to know when you’ll get your new card, visit Medicare.gov/NewCard and sign up to get email alerts from Medicare. You’ll get an email when cards start mailing in your state, and you’ll also get emails about other important Medicare topics. You can also sign in to your MyMedicare.gov account and see when your card is mailed. If you don’t have an account yet, visit MyMedicare.gov to create one.

Remember that mailing takes time, so you might get your card at a different time than friends or neighbors in your area. Once you get your new Medicare card:

  1. Destroy your old Medicare card so no one can get your personal information.
  2. Start using your Medicare card right away! Your doctors as well as other health care providers and facilities know that it’s coming, so carry it with you when you need care. Your Medicare coverage and benefits will stay the same.
  3. Protect your Medicare number like you would your Social Security Number. Beware of people contacting you about your new Medicare card and asking you for your Medicare number, personal information, or to pay a fee for your new card. Only give your new Medicare number to doctors, pharmacists, other health care providers, your insurer or people you trust to work with Medicare on your behalf. Remember, Medicare will never contact you uninvited to ask for your personal information. Visit Medicare.gov for tips to prevent Medicare fraud.

If you’re in a Medicare Advantage plan (like an HMO or PPO), your Medicare Advantage plan ID card is your main card for Medicare. You should still keep and use it whenever you need care. However, you should also carry your new Medicare card — you may be asked to show it.

For more information about your new Medicare card, visit go.medicare.gov/newcard.